Revisiting Past Award Winners from a Highly Opinionated Perspective

kline

For the last five months, Mike D’Angelo has been putting out a fantastic series over at The Dissolve called PERFORMANCE REVIEW. If you’re like me and adore anything acting or award season related, it’s absolutely essential reading. In fact, I’ve long considered doing something like this myself. D’Angelo describes the bi-weekly series as follows:

 Truly Great Acting is seldom recognized in its own time—at least officially, with trophies and such. Performance Review takes a retrospective, highly opinionated look at past award-winners. Each entry focuses on a specific category in a given year, in several different award ceremonies, in an effort to determine the year’s most criminally overlooked performance.  

This week, D’Angelo takes on the 1988 Best Supporting Actor category where he discusses the merits of the performances of Dean Stockwell (Married to the Mob), Alec Guinness (Little Dorrit) and Tim Robbins (Bull Durham) as well as Kevin Kline’s sublime work in A Fish Called Wanda. The later performance, which Kline won the Oscar for, still remains, at least in my mind, one of the best and boldest decisions ever made by the Academy.

If you’re interested and have the time, I highly suggest reading previous entries in his series:

1991 Best Supporting Actor (Jack Palance)

1967 Best Supporting Actress (Estelle Parsons)

2002 Best Actor (Adrian Brody)

1987 Best Actress (Cher)

2006 Best Supporting Actor (Alan Arkin)

1976 Best Supporting Actress (Beatrice Straight)

1939 Best Actor (Robert Donat)

2001 Best Actress (Halle Berry)

 

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